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International Update Volume 41, Issue 8

SITE REMEDIATION CASE WON AFTER LAW ON WHICH CASE FOUGHT AMENDED

Australia

Critics of a new multi-billion dollar development in Barangaroo, a Sydney suburb, will file a new claim to stop construction after a last-minute law change exempting Barangaroo projects from site remediation planning laws thwarted their previous case. Justice Peter Biscoe in the Land and Environment Court allowed the work to proceed only after Planning Minister Tony Kelly changed the applicable law just days before a decision was due.

NORWAY OPENS BARENTS SEA TO FURTHER DRILLING, DELAYS ASSESSMENT IN FISH-RICH WATERS

Norway

Norway announced plans last Friday to open a new zone for oil and gas activity in the Barents Sea, part of a deal struck by Prime Minister Jens Stoltenberg and coalition partners to give the oil industry greater access to environmentally sensitive areas. Stoltenberg said that he was looking to grant access within "an environmentally safe framework." The government will conduct an impact assessment, the first step toward opening up the area to drilling, after Russian authorities ratify the sea boundary.

ENVIRONMENTAL GROUPS ASK CANADIAN COURT TO DECIDE WHETHER EA REQUIRED BY LAW

Canada

Sierra Club Canada and the Canadian Environmental Law Association have asked the Federal Court of Canada for a judicial review of two approvals by the Canadian Nuclear Safety Commission that would allow the shipment of radioactive materials. Michael Binder, head of the commission, said that opposition to the approvals, which would allow Bruce Power Inc. to ship 16 steam generators through the Great Lakes and the St. Lawrence Seaway, is "not any more about safety" and is a ploy by anti-nuclear activists to prey on people's fears.