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Vibrant Environment

Trump’s Proposed Environmental Agenda May Be Easier Said (or Tweeted) Than Done

US White House Logo
Loyti Cheng
David A. Zilberberg
Monday, December 12, 2016

President-elect Donald Trump's environmental agenda to date has generally been focused on undoing certain specific Obama administration regulations, such as the Clean Power Plan (CPP) or the Waters of the United States (WOTUS) rule, and relaxing restrictions on domestic fossil fuel exploration and production.

Saving the African Pangolin: The Case of Zimbabwe

White-bellied pangolin, National Botanic Garden of Belgium
Nyasha Frank Mpahlo
Wednesday, November 16, 2016

Human threats to pangolins in Zimbabwe have been kept in check for hundreds of years by traditional practices, but the recent globalization of illicit trade in these scaly, anteater-like mammals has threatened to exterminate them. Held in high regard by traditional chiefs, village headmen, and the tribal communities in general, the pangolin has historically benefitted from human protection in Africa. Zimbabwean folklore advised that the hunting of the pangolin (haka) be strictly controlled, and the deliberate taming of the pangolin was a serious offense.

Environmental Law Institute's Take on the 2016 Presidential Election: Rising Above the Rhetoric

election 2016
Scott Fulton
Wednesday, November 9, 2016

Here at the Environmental Law Institute, we have started getting questions about the meaning of the election for environmental protection, and, in particular, for environmental law. As a 50 year-old non-partisan think-and-do tank focused on building good governance and rule of law in the environmental arena, we think it is important to look past campaign rhetoric in responding to this question. The election of President-Elect Trump was not in our view a referendum on the environment.

Lago Agrio: The Drama Continues

Guillermo Granja/Reuters
Nora Moraga-Lewy
Thursday, August 25, 2016

I was in the 10th grade when I first heard about the ecological and human health disaster caused by petroleum extraction in Ecuador. A film festival in my hometown showed Crude, a documentary that details the impact of abandoned oil fields near Lago Agrio and the accompanying legal battle. Local populations whose livelihoods and health were allegedly harmed by careless corporate and government actions had been fighting to hold Texaco accountable for cleanup and compensation since 1993. The film, however, focused on several key characters that became involved in the case many years later. There were lawyers (Steven Donzigner and Pablo Fajardo), a corporation (Chevron, which acquired Texaco in 2001), celebrities (including Sting), and a young and charismatic Presidente (Rafael Correa of Ecuador).

Brexit for Breakfast: Digesting What Brexit Means for Sustainability

Brexit
Alan B. Horowitz
Tuesday, July 12, 2016

As the head of a U.K.-based multinational’s Safety, Health, Environmental, and Sustainability function (and a former temporary resident of England), my fascination with the Brexit outcome has been marginally greater than, oh I don’t know . . . that of a Manhattan-based owner of a Scotland golf course. In fact, on the “morning after,” I was in a quaint Cambridge, U.K., hotel room preparing my remarks for a panel discussion later that day on the prospects for governments, financial institutions, and industry to collectively "rewire" our economy and promote sustainable growth.

Communication and Inclusion at the World Environmental Law Congress

Talia Fox
Thursday, June 16, 2016

From April 27-29, 2016, I had the opportunity to attend the World Environmental Law Congress in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, with colleagues from the International Network for Environmental Compliance and Enforcement (INECE) and ELI, including ELI’s president, Scott Fulton. Never having participated in an international gathering of this sort, I was struck by the scale of the event, which brought together over 400 environmental practitioners from 50 countries. Moreover, I was impressed by the various means of communication used at the Congress to make our conversations more accessible. I left the event convinced that the way we communicate—whether formal or familiar, institutionalized or improvised—must reflect the diversity and scope of individuals engaged in environmental problems and their solutions.

Thanks to Environmental Pioneers in the United States Who Set the Example for the Rest of the World

William Eichbaum, former Vice President World Wildlife Fund
Thursday, May 12, 2016

ELI was founded in 1969—a time when U.S. environmental law was in its infancy and needed a place for cultivation and growth (an imperative that is still incredibly relevant today given the interconnectedness and severity of conservation challenges across the globe). At that moment in time, individuals across the country looked around and saw rivers catching on fire, poor air quality making it hard for children to breathe, and unfettered toxic pollution.

Introducing ELI’s Blog: Vibrant Environment

International Colloquium: Judges and Environment
Scott Fulton
Thursday, May 5, 2016

Welcome to our new ELI Blog: Vibrant Environment. I hope that through this blog we will find ourselves talking both to long-time friends and partners as well as new readers. ELI is a big tent, and we are pleased to invite you into our community. With this blog, we hope to transcend what might often be our typical audience of environmental lawyers and practitioners and communicate about the important work that we are doing conversationally. The blog will provide a platform for ELI staff to comment on current events and projects.