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Toxic Substances (generally)

Legal Tools to Reduce Radon’s Risk: An Evaluation of Mandatory Radon-Resistant New Construction in Building Codes

According to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), residential exposure to radon gas represents the second-leading cause of lung cancer among smokers and the leading cause of lung cancer among nonsmokers in the United States....

Preventing Toxic Lead Exposure Through Drinking Water Using Point-of-Use Filtration

Lead exposure through drinking water is an acute and persistent problem in the United States. The Flint, Michigan, water crisis brought national attention to this problem, but every city is at risk where lead-containing materials...

The Minamata Convention on Mercury and the Future of Multilateral Environmental Agreements

The 2013 Minamata Convention on Mercury is a wide-ranging treaty posed to address the serious threat of mercury pollution. The United States adopted it as an executive agreement, breaking a decades-long stretch of failure to adopt...

Being Small in a Supersized World: Tackling the Problem of Low-Level Exposures in Toxic Tort Actions

Low-level toxic tort claims are challenging traditional tort notions of injury and causation. Low-level exposures form the basis of claims in both environmental contamination cases and toxic product liability actions and may involve...

Setting the Bar for “Injury” in Environmental Exposure Cases: How Low Can It Go?

On May 16, 2012, ELI convened a panel of experts to provide an overview and analysis of the tension between regulatory and common-law standards for injury in the context of toxic tort litigation. The speakers discussed and debated...

Dispersant Scrutiny Mirrors Larger Debate Over U.S. Chemical Control Policy

Dispersants have been a critical oil spill response tool for decades, used in at least 66 documented spill responses worldwide, and 25 spills in or near U.S. waters. Oil dispersants can reduce the coastal impact from a spill, hasten the...

State Authority to Regulate Toxins in Children's Consumer Products

Editors' Summary

The number and amount of toxic substances being discovered in children's consumer products have risen dramatically since 2006. State legislatures have been at the forefront in introducing and adopting policies to...

Using Competition-Based Regulation to Bridge the Toxics Data Gap

A person unfamiliar with the intricacies of chemical regulation in the United States might assume that regulators are hard at work weeding out dangerous products, requiring warnings on thousands of others, and collecting copious...

Comment on Using Competition-Based Regulation to Bridge the Toxics Data Gap

In her Article, Prof. Wendy Wagner takes on one of the core challenges of U.S. chemical management policy: how to assure that useful toxicity data is generated about chemicals in commerce. She offers a creative proposal for harnessing...

Comment on Using Competition-Based Regulation to Bridge the Toxics Data Gap

In Using Competition-Based Regulation to Bridge the Toxics Data Gap, Prof. Wendy Wagner offers a useful and provocative proposal intended to address the many shortcomings of current U.S. policy toward industrial chemicals. The proposal...