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Climate Change

The Legal Option: Suing the United States in International Forums for Global Warming Emissions

The George W. Bush Administration's refusal to deal seriously with the problem of global warming, perhaps the greatest environmental problem of our time, requires that the international community think seriously about alternative ways...

The Role of Carbon Sequestration in the U.S. Response to Climate Change--Challenges and Opportunities

Climate change is widely acknowledged as one of the greatest environmental challenges facing the United States and the international community.1 The Bush Administration's rejection2 of...

The U.S. Performance in Achieving Its 1992 Earth Summit Global Warming Commitments

Many participants in the global warming debate recounted in this Article appear either to have been unaware of or have chosen to ignore numerous commitments made by the United States pursuant to the 1992 United Nations Framework...

Seeking Prudent Policy in the Face of Uncertainty: Observations on an AALS Discussion of Global Climate Change

On January 5, 2002, the fourth day of the 102d annual meeting of the Association of American Law Schools (AALS) in New Orleans, Louisiana, the section on environmental law sponsored a well-attended, provocative panel discussion entitled...

The Kyoto Protocol: A Flawed Concept

In 2001, the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) issued its Third Assessment Report (TAR)1 on the prospects for and likely impact of increases in global average temperature over the next...

Competing Agendas and the Climate Change Negotiations: The United States, the European Union, and Japan

Human-induced climate change is considered by many scientists to be one of the most pressing international problems facing our planet. Yet, international efforts to address greenhouse gas emissions have been repeatedly stymied by...

Global Warming: Significant Shortcomings of Computer Climate Models

The 1997 Kyoto Protocol provides for a 5% reduction in 1990 levels of greenhouse gases by 2008-2012 in order to stem global warming. The developed nations have agreed to specific greenhouse gas reduction levels; the U.S. quota reduction...

Global Warming

Efficient combustion largely prevents the formation of many criteria pollutants. Carbon monoxide (CO) emissions usually are created by combustion in an oxygen deficient environment.1 Hydrocarbon emissions often...

Moving the Climate Change Debate From Models to Proposed Legislation: Lessons From State Experience

The United States is a party to the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (Framework Convention),1 which requires parties to implement programs and measures to reduce net greenhouse gas...

A Framework for Achieving Environmental Integrity and the Economic Benefits of Emissions Trading Under the Kyoto Protocol

Introduction

In a previous Article in ELR,1 the authors examined issues related to international greenhouse gas emissions trading under the as-yet unratified Kyoto Protocol to the United...